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my2020census.gov

Get Started Now!

Start your questionnaire at my2020census.gov

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Where are you counted?

Where are you counted?

Where you live on April 1, 2020!

You should count yourself at the place where you are living and sleeping most of the time as of April 1, 2020. If you are filling out the census for your home, you should count everyone who is or will be living there as of April 1, 2020.

Who counts?

Who counts?

Everyone!

The Census counts everyone living in the United States, once and only once, and in the right place. This means you count everyone living in your home! Sometimes it’s easy to know who to count, but other times you might have questions.

When do I respond?

When do I respond?

Now!

All households are invited to fill out the Census! Click here to view the timeline.

Your 2020 Census Timeline

Census Questions

Have questions? See if your situation applies below!

Babies and toddlers count! Remember to include them on your form!

Census Bureau:

Babies born on or before April 1, 2020, should be counted at the home where they will live or sleep most of the time, even if they are still in the hospital on Census Day.
Babies born after April 1, 2020, should not be counted in the 2020 Census.

Travelling on Census Day? Make sure you count yourself at your residence!

Census Bureau:

You should count yourself where you live and sleep most of the time, even if you are away from your usual residence on April 1, 2020.

If your visitors plan on returning home, make sure they are counted at their residence.

Census Bureau:

Visitors who are staying in your home on April 1, 2020, but who will return to their normal residence should be counted where they live and sleep most of the time.

Residents of foreign countries who are temporarily visiting the United States on vacation or business on April 1, 2020, should not be counted.

You still count regardless of your citizenship status. If you’re living in the United States, you deserve to be counted in your community!

Census Bureau:

Citizens of foreign countries who are living in the United States, including members of the diplomatic community, should be counted at the U.S. residence where they live and sleep most of the time.

Citizens of foreign countries who are temporarily visiting the United States on vacation or business on April 1, 2020, should not be counted.

Are you employed by the U.S. Government or a member of the U.S. Military? If not, you don’t need to respond to the Census!

Census Bureau:

If you live outside the country, and you are not employed by the U.S. government or as a member of the U.S. military, you are not counted in this census.

The Census Bureau will use existing official records to count military and civilian employees of the U.S. government who are living outside the United States as well as the dependents living with them overseas. These individuals do not need to respond to a questionnaire.

Count yourself where you live and sleep most of the time!

Census Bureau:

If you live at multiple places throughout the year, count yourself at the address where you live and sleep most of the time. If you split your time evenly between two or more places, count yourself where you are staying on April 1, 2020.

Fill out the form for where you’ll be living on April 1st!

Census Bureau:

If you are moving, be sure to count yourself just once, in one home. Count yourself where you were living on April 1, 2020.
If you move into your new residence on April 1, count yourself at that residence.
If you move out of your old residence on April 1 but will not move into your new home until April 2 or later, count yourself at the old residence.

In College? Count yourself where your school is!

In high school? Your parents/guardians will count you at home!

Census Bureau:

If you are a high school or college student, your circumstances will determine where you are counted in the 2020 Census:

Boarding school students below the college level should be counted at the home of their parents or guardians.
Students who are living at home should be counted at their home address.
College students who live away from home should be counted at the on- or off-campus residence where they live and sleep most of the time, even if they are at home on April 1, 2020. If they live in housing designed for college students (such as dorms and apartments with “by-the-bed” leases), they will be counted as part of the Group Quarters Operation. If they live off campus in housing that is not designed for college students (such as a private house or apartment), they should count themselves at that address.
High school or college students who are living or studying abroad outside the United States on April 1, 2020, are not counted in the census.
Foreign students living and attending school in the United States should be counted at the on- or off-campus residence where they live and sleep most of the time.

Where you’re counted depends on what type of patient you are.

Census Bureau:

The following types of patients will be counted at the residence where they live and sleep most of the time:

  • Patients in the hospital for a routine stay.
  • Patients at inpatient hospice facilities.
  • Newborn babies (who should be counted where they will live after leaving the hospital).

The following types of patients will be counted at the health care facility where they’re staying on April 1, 2020:

  • People with no usual home.
  • People in psychiatric hospitals or psychiatric units for long-term, non acute care.
  • People in nursing facilities.
  • Please visit Counting People in Group Living Arrangements for more information.

You count, and thank you for your service!

Census Bureau:

If you are an active duty service member (or a Reserves or Guard member), your circumstances will determine how you are counted in the 2020 Census:

  • Living in a housing unit on a military base? You can respond to the census online, by phone, or by mail.
  • Living in U.S. barracks on a military base? The Census Bureau will identify a military point of contact on your base to ensure that you are counted. This could mean completing the census form yourself.
  • Living in a campground on a military base? A census worker will visit you at the campground and collect your response.
  • Assigned to a U.S. military vessel? A military point of contact, vessel project officer, commander, or operator will provide a census form for you to complete.
  • Deployed outside the United States on Census Day? Using existing data provided by the Department of Defense, the Census Bureau will count you at the U.S. residence where you live and sleep most of the time.
  • Stationed outside the United States on Census Day? Using existing data provided by the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security, the Census Bureau will count you (along with any dependents living with you outside the U.S.) as part of the U.S. federally affiliated overseas population.

You’ll be counted at your facility.

Census Bureau:

People who are living in any of the following facility types on April 1, 2020, will be counted at their facility:

  • Federal and state prisons.
  • Federal detention centers.
  • Local jails and other municipal confinement facilities.
  • Correctional residential facilities.

Please visit Counting People in Group Living Arrangements for more information.

You’ll be counted at your shelter.

Census Bureau:

If you are living in an emergency or transitional shelter that provides sleeping facilities for people experiencing homelessness, you will be counted at the shelter.

Please visit Counting People in Group Living Arrangements for more information.

Count yourself where you are staying on April 1, 2020.

Census Bureau:

If you have been displaced by a natural disaster, you should count yourself where you are living and sleeping most of the time as of April 1, 2020. If your usual residence is not condemned or destroyed, you should count yourself there.

If your usual residence is condemned or destroyed, you should count yourself where you are staying on April 1, 2020, such as a friend’s or family member’s home or a residence where you are living until your new or previous home is built or repaired.

The Census Bureau will come to you! You can still respond online or over the phone.

Census Bureau:

If you are living or staying at a campground, a recreational vehicle park, a marina, a hotel, or another transitory location, the Census Bureau has a special process in place to make sure you are counted in the 2020 Census. Census takers will visit these locations to conduct interviews in person. If you have a usual home elsewhere, you will be asked to provide the address of that home so that you can be counted there. Please visit How Are People Counted at RV Parks, Campgrounds, and Other Transitory Locations? for more information.

Count yourself where you are staying on April 1, 2020.

Census Bureau:

If you do not have a permanent address, you should count yourself where you are living on April 1, 2020. For example, if you are temporarily staying with a friend, you would be counted as part of the census form for their address.

The Census Bureau has specific processes in place to count people who are experiencing homelessness, including people who are in shelters, at soup kitchens and mobile food vans, and in non-sheltered, outdoor locations such as tent encampments. In those cases, census takers will coordinate with shelter directors, service providers, partners, and local census offices.

People experiencing homelessness can also go to a public library and complete a census questionnaire online by providing a description of the location where they were sleeping on April 1, 2020.

Count your kids where they spend the most nights. If it’s equal time, count them where they are on April 1, 2020.

Census Bureau:

Parents and guardians should count children at the address where they live and sleep most of the time. If a child spends an equal amount of time in two or more homes, count the child where they were staying on April 1, 2020.

Count them at your household if they sleep most nights there.

Census Bureau:

All children, including babies, should be counted at their usual residence, even if their parent does not live and sleep at the same address. The usual residence is where the child lives and sleeps most of the time. If you are not sure, count them at the address of the place where the child was staying on April 1, 2020.

Count them at your household if they sleep most nights there.

Census Bureau:

The foster children should be counted at their usual residence, where they live and sleep most of the time. If you are not sure, count them at the address of the place where the child was staying on April 1, 2020.

Count them at your household if they sleep most nights there.

Census Bureau:

The children of roommates, housemates, roomers, and tenants should be counted at their usual residence. This means where the children live and sleep most of the time. If you are not sure, count them at the address of the place where they were staying on April 1, 2020.

Do you share an address? If so, count them. If not, they get to count themselves.

Census Bureau:

If the boarder or renter lives with you and the other members of your home, you should include them on your questionnaire. If the rented portion of your home has a separate address, the boarder or renter should complete their own questionnaire.

What to Expect
What’s coming in the mail?
What does the Census ask?
Why do they ask these questions?
Responding to the Census

How do I respond?

Staying Safe

The Census + Safety

Avoiding Fraud + Scams

Getting the Facts

Getting the Facts

There are a lot of rumors out there about the Census. Get the facts here!

Does the 2020 Census ask about citizenship status?

Does the 2020 Census ask about citizenship status?

No!

The 2020 Census does not ask whether you or anyone in your home is a U.S. citizen.

Are non-citizens counted in the census?

Are non-citizens counted in the census?

YES!

Everyone counts. The 2020 Census counts everyone living in the country, including non-citizens. Learn more about who should be counted when you complete the 2020 Census.